Transitions Vol.5 No.2


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Date: Tue, 17 Feb 1998 08:52:08 -0800
From: MINELRES moderator <minelres@mailbox.riga.lv>
Subject: Transitions Vol.5 No.2

From: MINELRES moderator  <minelres@mailbox.riga.lv>

Transitions Vol.5 No.2


Content of the next issue of Transitions (Vol.5 No.2, February
1998):

>From the Editor: Rummaging in bookstores, then and now, by Michael
T.Kaufman

Letters

Notes from along the way: Russia, Transcaucasia and Central Asia,
Eastern Europe, Central Europe, Southeastern Europe

In their own words: Czech Republic: Harsh words; Russia: Hit first,
think later?

ESSAYS

Explaining the Soviet Collapse, by Peter Rutland (Taking on the big
question: how does an empire end?)

Kill, Then Tell, by Filip Svarm ("Soldiers get killed. Commanders
write books and make excuses." Balkan generals explain their wars)

Albania's Struggling Literary Scene, by John Hodgson (Writers are as
confused  by social tremors as their readers)

Poland Contends With Its Vanished Jews, by Konstanty Gebert (Like an
amputee, Poland belatedly suffers the phantom pain of its Jewish
losses)

REVIEWS

Polish True Confessions, by Jakub Karpinski (Politicians as authors
add colorful pieces to the complex mosaic of Polish history)

Yeltsin, Tabloid-Style, by Vladimir Shlapentokh (The presidents
former bodyguard provides an account of Russias unsavory political
elite)

Liberalism Under the Microscope, by Michael J.G.Cain (Three volumes
of essays on liberal economic and political thought in Central
Europe)

The Myth of Truth, by Mihai Pascu (Manipulating history in Romania)

A Skewed Intellectual History of Ukraine, by Oleksandr Hrytsenko
(The first English-language anthology of Ukrainian intellectual
history is distorted by the editors patriotic preference)

The Presidential Pulpit, by Andrew Hicks (Vaclav Havels speeches
reveal changes in his world as well as in himself)

LITERARY DISPATCHES

Crime and Punishment for a New Russia, by Anthony Olcott (The
difference between law and justice)

Cleansing the Future, Rewiring the Past, by Elena Chinyaeva (New
Russian and American science fiction stretches the genre)

Learning to Write in Freedom, by Martin M. Simecka (Slovak writers
buck the state)

The Unbearable Lightness of Best Sellers, by Daniel Anyz and Tomas
Vrba (The Czech literary scene grapples with market conditions and
how-to books)

The Old, Wise Poet, by Irena Grudzinska Gross (Czeslaw Milosz's
depths get deeper)

An Esoteric Baltic Primer, by Villmos Voigt (Baltic Studies in
Hungarian)

Breaking the Mold, Following Fashion, by Volodymyr Dibrova
(Ukrainian novelists go postmodern)

Post-Dayton Prose, by Nebojsa Bjelakovic (Critical distance on the
Balkan wars)

Cartoons: Croatia, Russia, Ukraine

Media Profile: Gazeta Wyborcza Comes of Age, by Josephine Schmidt

Media Watch: Armenia: Media solidarity; Yugoslavia: A puzzling boom;
Elsewhere

Point-Counter-Point: Is a Free Market Bad for Good Books? No, by
Predrag Raos; Yes, by Istvan Bart

Cityscape
On the streets of Belgrade, by Chuck Sudetic

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